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20130801
20130831
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KRCB (PBS) 15
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English 11
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)
for word of every doe midwest incommunication in this country. >> the idea that n.s.a. is keeping files on americans as a general rule just isn't true. >> woodruff: then, rebels fired scores of rockets on the syrian city of homs as the assad regime celebrated army day. margaret warner gets the latest on the bloody civil war from npr's deborah amos. >> brown: law enforcement bids farewell to f.b.i. director robert mueller. ray suarez explores the transformation of the bureau after the 9-11 attacks. >> woodruff: and we hear from two u.s. senators leading the push to keep the military's sexual assault cases in the chain of command. gwen ifill talks to new hampshire republican kelly ayotte and missouri democrat claire mccaskill. >> the other side has wanted to make this argument about victims vs. uniforms. that's a false premise. this argument is about how we can protect victims the best. >> woodruff: that's all ahead on tonight's "newshour." >> major funding for the pbs newshour has been provided by: ♪ ♪ moving our economy for 160 years. bnsf, the engine that connects us. >> and by th
on the "newshour": bradley manning gets 35 years in jail; how the n.s.a. spies on internet activity and eleanor holmes norton looks back at the march on washington. but first, with the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> holman: an egyptian court today ordered the release of ex-president hosni mubarak. a hearing was held at tora prison, where the ailing 85-year-old has been detained for two years. once freed, he'll be placed under house arrest on orders of egypt's prime minister. mubarak also faces charges of failing to prevent the deaths of protesters in the 2011 uprising that ousted him from power. meanwhile the european union held emergency talks on the egyptian crisis in brussels. its foreign policy chief, catherine ashton, said the e.u. member nations strongly condemn the recent spate of violence between the interim government and supporters of the muslim brotherhood. >> we've agreed, as well, to review the issue of our assistance to egypt with the understanding of assistance to the most vulnerable groups and to civil society must continue. member states have agreed to suspend e
pwas given asylum in moscow. i expect him to talk about the issue and answer questions on the nsa civilian -- nsa surveillance program, to explain it because there is a growing distrust in the u.s. when it comes to privacy. from what i can speculate -- i think also he will touch n the peace talks between israelis and palestinians. >> in washington with our crystal ball, thank you very much. >> let's not forget that this cooling of relations resulted from russia granting asylum to nsa whistleblower edward snowden. now in a related story, a secure e-mail service thought to be used by snowden has been abruptly closed down. the service, lavabit, appears to have made the decision to shut itself down rather than comply with demand by the government to provide access to customer information. >> the company owner said in a statement, "i have been forced to make a difficult decision -- to become complicit in crimes against the american people or walk away from nearly 10 years of hard work by shutting down lavabit." u.s. president barack obama has spent part of the week huddling to brainsto
: overreach at the n.s.a.; a planet-hunter goes dark; opening up a pristine rain forest to oil drilling; shields and brooks on the week's news; plus, harper and musslewhite on playing the blues. but first, the other news of the day. here's kwame holman. >> reporter: the number of dead in thursday's car bombing in beirut, leban, went up at least 22 today, with more than 300 wounded. it was the deadliest attack there in nearly three decades, engulfing a busy street in fire and smoke. the site is near a complex where the shiite militant group hezbollah holds rallies. today, the group's leader, sheikh hassan nasrallah, blamed sunni radicals. he pledged to double the number of hezbollah forces helping fight sunni rebels in syria. a sudden wave of refugees from syria is pouring into northern iraq. u.n. refugee officials reported today that many come from aleppo, syria's largest city, and their numbers approach 8,000 a day. they've been crossing at a new bridge over the tigris river. there already are more than 150,000 syrian refugees registered in iraq. wall street ended a tough week on a dow
disclosed by nsa leaker edward snowden show a massive amount of money set aside for u.s. spying operations outside the cia or the nsa. amen jaifers joins us with me. sounds like a spy novel. >> absolutely. this is one of the most grossly held secrets of the intelligence, how much does it spend on the things that it does, how many employees does the united states intelligence community actually have? they want to keep that secret. thanks to this leak from edward snowd snowden, "the washington post" broke a blockbuster story and detailed for the first time what exactly is in the budget for the intelligence committee, including more than 21,000 employees at the cia. the first time we've seen this level. >> very fascinating reading that story. i know you looked over it. what stood out most for you? what do we know now more than before? >> in this era of drone warfare around the world, the cia reporting a 14.7 billion-dollar budget, that makes it the biggest component for a long time folks thought maybe the cia was no longer the dominant player in u.s. intelligence, maybe the national spashl in
the top intelligence agents. they want to know how they aided programs directed at citizens. the nsa affair has been laid to rest. he has given the parliamentary intelligence committee written confirmation that it never broke german law. the nsa does get information from germany, collected by the intelligence agency. it gathers information in many parts of the world. >> the data is almost exclusively data on foreign activities. >> the opposition parties said that they have a duty to protect parties. the u.s. -- they want to know more about how the u.s. software works. >> we still do not know how it works. what privacy rights are being threatened? how much information is the u.s. collecting on german citizens? >> the government says it will continue to ask washington about what is going on and answer the concerns of the german public. the need to regain voters trust. >> inspectors have arrived to investigate claims that they have been used. >> they will spend the next two weeks gathering evidence but stopped short of determining who is responsible for any of the alleged attacks. >> ea
nothing has been done wrong. >> it has worked with the nsa and that is completely inappropriate. >> some are calling with a -- for a special parliamentary commission. >> we get the feeling the intelligence agencies only tell us what they absolutely have to instead of what they really should be telling us. >> there will be plenty to discuss when the control committee meets next monday. the german agencies will face questions about the extent of their cooperation. >> other stories making news around the world. japan's aggression in the nuclear power plant is likely discharging radioactive groundwater. they have a barrier designed to contain it and it threatens to seek into a nearby bay. >> protesters are demanding morsi's reinstatement as president in egypt. >> allies of the prime minister have held talks, concerned that the future of the current prime minister and supporters have been threatening to withdraw from the coalition after the media magnate was sentenced for tax fraud. >> there is a great concern when there is a violation of food safety. >> several countries have banned a formul
the magnitude of the nsa surveillance program and also had some effect on politics. two very different cases when it comes to handling the content of them. >> thanks so very much. here in berlin, police have been keeping protesters apart on the third day of demonstrations over a newly opened center for up to 400 asylum-seekers. tensions flared and there were arrests when supporters sought to end a rally by anti- immigration groups. >> the number of asylum seekers in germany has almost doubled year on year to over 52,000. the issue of immigration, surprisingly, is not a major topic of discussion in the campaign ahead of the september 22 election. >> many of the refugees come from conflict zones. afghanistan or serious. but they have not found peace in germany. this is what they have to put up with. opponents make their views clear. most of them clearly belong to the far right. on the other side are those who support the refugees. the atmosphere is heated. every day, more protesters arrived, wanting to show that the majority of germans are not xenophobic. >> i think it is important we make a c
documents obtained from n.s.a. leaker edward snowden. they claimed the n.s.a. also bugged the european union's offices in washington. in china, disgraced political figure bo xilai now awaits the verdict in his corruption trial. in closing arguments today, bo denounced the two main witnesses against him. he charged his wife is deranged and his former police chief is dishonest. prosecutors argued bo made millions of dollars illegally and interfered in a murder investigation. he was a rising star in the ruling communist party before the scandal broke. the school year is just getting started in most of the u.s., and already the weather has intervened. severe heat in the midwest today forced schools in at least six states to end classes early. readings reached nearly 100 degrees in much of the region, including nebraska, iowa, minnesota, the dakotas and illinois. many of the affected schools have sections that are not air conditioned. on wall street today, the dow jones industrial average lost 64 points to close at 14,946. the nasdaq fell a fraction of a point to close at 3657. those are some of
and appointing an n.s.a. representative committed to privacy, and inviting outside experts to review how the government does its surveillance. the measures come as the administration has faced mounting scrutiny over its surveillance programs following the leaks from former spy agency contractor edward snowden. mr. obama was asked if today's move changed his mindset about snowden. >> is he now more a whistle- blower than he is a hacker, as you called him at one point, or somebody that shouldn't be filed charges? and should he be provided more protection? is he a patriot? >> i don't think mr. snowden was a patriot. as i said in my opening remarks, i called for a thorough review of our surveillance operations before mr. snowden made these leaks. my preference-- and i think the american people's preference-- would have been for a lawful, orderly examination of these laws; a thoughtful, fact-based debate that would then lead us to a better place, because i never made claims that all the surveillance technologies that have developed since the time some of these laws had been put in place someh
of information he has about american intelligence about the n.s.a. for their own good. that would be acting they might consider in their own national interest. so are they doing that giving him everything he knows? >> and you can ask the same question about the chinese when he was in hong kong. >> rose: what do you assume? >> i would assume that their intelligence services would be delinquent in their duty if they didn't make every effort to do that. i don't know the answer. >> rose: i talked to a former c.i.a. person and said would we be doing that if we had the opportunity? of course. >> his father says it hasn't happened. i don't know. i don't know. >> rose: okay, what about syria? is -- where do you think -- where do you think the effort to put together some kind of -- and the united states desperately wants and john kerry desperately wants russian cooperation to figure out a way to stop syria from becoming a stalemate and a civil war that just goes on and on and on. >> rose: and putin wants it, too. so you would think that would be enough to act on. here's the conflict no story began y
that the n.s.a., which is so prominent in the news these days slistenning carefully to the types of communications going on. now, that communication can sometimes be ambiguous. but if you put all that together, it can clearly point in the direction of one actor in this, and i think there is probably, as has been saished the preponderance of evidence-- public or not public-- falls on the side of the syrian government did this. >> brown: the context is what happened in iraq, where you were involved, where you looked at what happened ooferreds. to what degree as what happened there affected how these kind-- how this kind of work it done? >> well, the weapons inspectors it turned out did a much better job than anybody thought. their teakniques and methods have improved a fair amount. on the other hand, the intelligence community, they've had their fingers burned. they got it massively long in 2002 and 2003. so they are going to be ve reluctant to make categorical statements -- like slam dunk-- to policy makers. they will caveat their language and that will make policy makers' lives m
Search Results 0 to 14 of about 15 (some duplicates have been removed)